Credits
Client: My Wife
Design
Design Direction: Nick Adam
Design Execution: Nick Adam
Print Production
Risograph Printing: By Nick Adam at Design Museum Chicago
As my wife and I prepared for a yard sale she invited me to make some signs to post around the neighborhood. Little did she expect, this was a dream project. The design of these Yard Sale signs were approached under a systems-based, identity lens. Here, variation is a tactic towards dynamism helping grab and increase attention.

Along with the For Sale sign, the Yard Sale sign typically finds itself executed in neon-orange Helvetica on black, or the homemade markered approach. While the markered signs may have some humanistic intent, it often fails in legibility and distinctiveness. Both approaches also lack the ability to portray qualities of the goods being sold. The issue here is two-fold — lack of an idea and the formal execution not aligning with experience. 

Compositionally, the poster is set minimally where the same cut of type operates in three sizes. Line-height, and letter-spacing defined the three typestyles based on each being one-third smaller then the other. Headline copy was defined by four-letter words capable of ragging well when centered. The subheads were written as 12 character lines that could justify hard to contrast the ragged edge.

Fritz Quadrata was chosen for it's precision and attention to detail without losing its hand-crafted appearance. The historical usages of Friz Quadrata in Black Flag's logo, the titling of Scarface and Law and Order were nods that I too enjoyed and felt my ideal yard sale customer might unconsciously identify based on plausible past experiences. Wanting this use of Friz Quadrata to work uniquely several characters were modified with multiple variations to align closer to hand rendered form. Several characters were completely redrawn for optimal horizontal and vertical relationships.
Credits
Client: My Wife
Design
Design Direction: Nick Adam
Design Execution: Nick Adam
Print Production
Risograph Printing: By Nick Adam at Chicago Design Museum
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